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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Customer goods giant Johnson & Johnson is attractive an Oklahoma judge’s $572 million order against the organization and its subsidiaries for assisting fuel the state’s opioid crisis.

The
organization filed an appeal with the Oklahoma Supreme Court on Wednesday,
arguing the ruling was an “unprecedented interpretation of Oklahoma
public nuisance law.”

The judge’s choice that the promoting and
sale of a lawful item can constitute a public nuisance could have
grave implications for all firms that operate in the state, the
organization warned.

“That novel ruling has immense public-policy
implications, undermining item-liability law guidelines, which have constantly
governed disputes more than the promoting and sales of goods, and
threatening wide-ranging liability for businesses that do business enterprise in
Oklahoma,” attorneys wrote in the appeal.

In his ruling final
month, Cleveland County District Judge Thad Balkman ordered the organization
to spend $572 million to aid address the harm the opioid crisis has
triggered in the state. Attorneys for the organization have stated that figure was
grossly inflated.

The state had presented the judge with a program
to abate the crisis that would have expense among $12.six billion for 20
years to $17.five billion more than 30 years.

A spokesman for Oklahoma Lawyer Basic Mike Hunter stated their workplace is reviewing the appeal.

Oklahoma’s
case was closely watched for the reason that it was the initial amongst a lot more than 1,500
comparable lawsuits against drugmakers and other folks involved in the sale of
opioids filed by state, regional and tribal governments to proceed to
trial.

Just before the trial started, Oklahoma reached settlements
totaling $355 million from two other groups of defendant drugmakers,
which includes Oxycontin-maker Purdue Pharma and Israeli-owned Teva
Pharmaceuticals.

Purdue filed for bankruptcy protection earlier
this month, the initial step in a program it says would offer $10 billion
to $12 billion to aid reimburse state and regional governments for the
expenses connected with cleaning up the harm from the opioid crisis.



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